Brazil Police Seize Greek Bust Suspected of Having Been Stolen From Libya – Al Marsad

A marble sculpture depicting the Greek god Asclepius, said to have been stolen more than three decades ago from a museum in Libya, was seized by the Federal Police in Brazil on Thursday.

(LIBYA, 30 July 2021) – Brazilian authorities said its Federal Police executed a search and seizure warrant on a historical artefact that was acquired online and which was suspected of having been stolen from a museum in Libya in 1990.

According to Brazilian polite the artefact seized is the bust of Asclepius, the Greek god of healing, dating back to 400BC. The authorities suspect it was the object stolen from a Libyan museum in the 1990.

The request to search for the piece was made in a communication from Interpol Tripoli, in Libya, to its national central in Brazil. According to Interpol’s secretariat-general, the sculpture is on the organization’s database of stolen works of art.

The Federal Police said the recovered artefact was seized by the Revenue Service at the International Airport of Viracopos, Campinas, São Paulo, and stayed at the customs unit from February to September 2020, but was released by the buyer after the imports documents were presented. The illicit nature of the purchase could not be verified, said the authorities.

The object is now expected to be analyzed by experts, and once its authenticity and origin is confirmed then it will be returned to Libya.

The buyer of the artefact is expected to be questioned on the provenance of the item.

© ALMARSAD ENGLISH (2021)

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